Headline: The Risk of Termination Shock From Solar Geoengineering

If solar geoengineering were to be deployed so as to mask a high level of global warming, and then stopped suddenly, there would be a rapid and damaging rise in temperatures. This effect is often referred to as termination shock, and it is an influential concept. Based on studies of its potential impacts, commentators often cite termination shock as one of the greatest risks of solar geoengineering. However, there has been little consideration of the likelihood of termination shock, so that conclusions about its risk are premature. This paper explores the physical characteristics of termination shock, then uses simple scenario analysis to plot out the pathways by which different driver events (such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, or political action) could lead to termination. It then considers where timely policies could intervene to avert termination shock. We conclude that some relatively simple policies could protect a solar geoengineering system against most of the plausible drivers. If backup deployment hardware were maintained and if solar geoengineering were implemented by agreement among just a few powerful countries, then the system should be resilient against all but the most extreme catastrophes. If this analysis is correct, then termination shock should be much less likely, and therefore much less of a risk, than has previously been assumed. Much more sophisticated scenario analysis—going beyond simulations purely of worst‐case scenarios—will be needed to allow for more insightful policy conclusions.

Publication Year
2018
Publication Type
Academic Articles
Citation

Parker, A., Irvine, P. J. (2018): The Risk of Termination Shock From Solar Geoengineering. - Earth's Future, 6, 3, p. 456-467.DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/2017EF000735

DOI
10.1002/2017EF000735
Links
http://publications.iass-potsdam.de/pubman/item/escidoc:3233893:3/component/esc…
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