IASS researcher Serah Kiragu talks with a Kenyan farmer about his experience of putting new land management methods into practice.
IASS researcher Serah Kiragu talks with a Kenyan farmer about his experience of putting new land management methods into practice. Serah Kiragu

Headline: Soil Protection and Rehabilitation for Food Security

Laufzeit:
bis

Limited access to financing, insecure land tenure, and insufficient agricultural services – the factors that constrain the uptake of sustainable land management techniques by farmers in developing countries are well known. But how can smallholder farmers in developing countries be best supported in their efforts to manage their lands sustainably? The project Soil Protection and Rehabilitation for Food Security aims to address this question. Working alongside diverse stakeholders and local populations, researchers are developing new approaches to facilitate the uptake of sustainable land management techniques. This project partners with organisations on the ground in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Kenya and India.

Millions of hectares of fertile land are destroyed annually worldwide as a result of bad farming practices and overcultivation. Periods of drought or torrential rains, which have been exacerbated by climate change, are accelerating this development in some parts of the world. Small farmers in developing countries who depend on fertile soils for their livelihoods are hardest hit. But it’s in these countries in particular that many factors impede the transition to a form of agriculture that conserves resources. The project investigates how small farmers can be supported in their efforts to cultivate their land more sustainably. The focus of IASS research in this area is on the following five countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Kenya and India.

Removing the barriers to sustainable land management

Limited access to markets, a lack of finances, insecure land tenure, and insufficient agricultural services – the factors that militate against the uptake of sustainable land management techniques in developing countries are well known. But how can they be reduced and overcome at local level? To answer that question, researchers work closely with decision-makers and agricultural practitioners. Above all, smallholders and their agricultural advisors are consulted.

Supporting a mutual learning process

A process of mutual learning aims to find solutions that are in tune with the needs and circumstances of local farmers. With this in mind, participatory research agendas will be developed and implemented in all five countries. The project seeks to remove some of the barriers to sustainable land management in order to protect land resources and guarantee the food security of rural populations.

Special Initiative “ONEWORLD without Hunger”

This IASS research project is being undertaken in parallel to the GIZ (German Agency for International Development) programme of the same name. Both contribute to the Special Initiative “ONEWORLD without Hunger” of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). The results of the programme will be presented in a flagship publication for policymakers and the wider public.